FEMSLICK | BASEMENT THEATRE | PRIDE FESTIVAL

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FAFSWAG brings the vision of artist Akashi Fisiinaua to the stage, presenting FEMSLICK, a series of vignettes set against underground Vogue Culture in Auckland.  Flexing urgency and vitality, this world is dripping in body politics, culture vultures, urban aesthetics and lots of Banji realness.

Told through movement, soundscape and urban material culture, this devised work scrutinises redundant gender norms and tired cultural codes with vivid and timely responses that pull no punches. Unpacking the complexities of queer brown bodies as they navigate cultural and social space in real time.

Synced to the rhythmic pulse of a Vogue ball this work connects its audience directly into its advocacy of self-defence, self-love and self-preservation. Don’t expect to remain sedated and docile like passive voyeurs. It’s not that kind of party. FEMSLICK stays f*cking up the patriarchy, one Caucasian space at a time.

Produced by FAFSWAG Arts Collective and funded by Creative New Zealand. Featuring Cypris Afakasi, Falencie Filipo, Akashi Fisiinaua, Gabriel Halatoa, Moe Laga, Jaydess Nand, Jacob Temata, Jaycee Tanuvasa.

Direction by Akashi Fisiinaua and styling by Jasper Powell.

It’ll be a short season so be sure to get in and hook it up with tix before they all go missing and you’re left with some flat face emoji’s. Click the image below to book your tickets.

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BASEMENT THEATRE / STUDIO / 6.30pm  / Tuesday 14 – Friday 17 February 2017

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PLEASE, decolonise your own shit first!

PLEASE, decolonise your own shit first!

Buzzwords are frustrating asf. If I can, I like to avoid them. Yeah, sometimes there a times that you HAVE to use them because they sum up exactly what you’re trying to say but for the most part, I feel like people use them as a way to say ‘Look at me, I’m relevant asf!’ No bitch, you aint. You just using a word that you saw that one time on Tumblr right before scrolling down to find the porn.

At the moment, the one that pisses me off the most is ‘DECOLONISATION’. Now I’m all about fighting against outdated colonial ideas that continue to oppress people. I think that colonising cultures are harmed by colonisations, just as indigenous cultures are. Hell, I see it happening in my own family (which is a mix of Samoan, British, Maori, Japanese, Cook Island and German influences). I believe that moving back to some of our indigenous ways of knowing, doing and being (I say some because I’m not about that #CannibalLife) are some of the most powerful ways of finding out who you are and how you fit in your world. For me as a genderqueer, masculine-attracted, male-presenting, sapiosexual; it is so much easier to start by saying I am Samoan from Sapunaoa and Vailu’utai, Scottish from Glasgow, and English from Ilford. That I’m the youngest in my generation. That mum was born here in NZ and my dad migrated to NZ from Samoa. That I have three sisters and a brother. That I have 12 nieces and nephews. That I actively practice fa’aSamoa because I believe in fa’aSamoa values like alofa, fa’aaloalo, tautua, and ‘aiga. Because who I am is where I have come from and the people that have and continue to make me.

But I keep hearing things like ‘fuck white people’ and ‘I’m like SO decolonised.’ Where is the sincerity in that? Where is the alofa and the fa’aaloalo? Who are you serving by saying shit like that? Are you aware of who is hearing that bullshit and how it affects them?

So, I’ma say something once and I need y’all to hear what I’m trying to say with all the love and understanding that I can muster but also with a staunch conviction:

I am 100% committed to my fa’aSamoa. But I am also White and not ashamed of that. So instead of attacking hateful or ignorant people with more hate, attack them with love and understanding. If they won’t hear them, walk away knowing that your own soul and integrity is still intact, and that you have done justice to the ways of your ancestors.

In the words of Tupua Tamasese Lealofi III:

“My blood has been spilt for Samoa. I am proud to give it. Do not dream of avenging it, as it was spilt in peace. If I die, peace must be maintained at any price.”

At what point do we stop hating people and start hating systems? #DontHateThePlayer #HateTheGame #Filemu

Author: Jonathan Selu

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S O F T & B L U N T

cropped-sb-header.jpgS O F T & B L U N T

Vogue Night
Saturday 26th November
8pm – 12am
$5 – walkers
$10 – general admission
R18 event
FAMILY BAR
270 Karangahape Rd, Auckland, 1010

CATEGORIES 

Soft & Cunt 

Open to All Bring it like Envy… “Its Soft not Slow!” Your Vogue should emphasise a soft, graceful, beautiful and easy flow.

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Sex Siren

Butch Queen & Fem Queen “Aren’t you cold?” The objective is to lure the Judges and the audience in with your confidence, sex appeal, and your body. NO VOGUEING!

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Butch Queen vs Fem Queens & Women’s Performance

“Sis you can’t enter that category cuz you’re not a girl… “Now here’s your chance!” Vogue Category – Get Yo 10s then battle. All FQ’s & Women will go up against the BQ’s until the last person is standing… even if it’s just BQ vs BQ in the end.

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Runway 

Open to All “She’s dancing, Chop Her!” There’s no need to dance in this category, just give the judges an amazing Runway walk, short and simple.

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Dramatics 

Open to All “Virgin Vogue Performance… I mean Dramatics” It’s about serving big energy and not necessarily big dips… You know what? Just do what you want, the audience will gag anyway.

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This event is Hosted by Darren and Jaycee. For queries please contact Event Coordinator Jaycee Tanuvasa Email: Jaycee_tanuvasa@hotmail.com 

For Media queries please contact FAFSWAG at fafswagball@gmail.com 

IGNITE |Performing Arts Workshops

Here is a line up of young Pacific Arts practitioners sharing their skills and experience. This week at Mangere East Metro Theatre you can catch Jaycee Tanuvasa, Darren Taniue, Maxine Etuati, Sam Samau and Isaac Ah Kiong share space and present a custom series of free performing arts workshops. This includes five different genres, Movement & Dance, Physical Thatre, Contemporary, Pacific Fusion, Hip Hop and Vogue.

This team of P.I.P.A graduates have featured in various stage, film and dance projects over the past years and have an impressive portfolio of performing arts work, both collectively and also as individual arts practitioners.

We got a chance to colab with these artist to design their promotional images for the workshop. We really happy with the results. We’re also really excited by these passionate artist and what they have to share with the community. So make sure you get out there to be part of what looks like a fun workshop series. We’ll definitely be there. x

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AITU VOGUE BALL

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One of our favourite categories in previous FAFSWAG Vogue Balls has been POLY TYPICAL. It’s a category we designed to bring out the indigenous context that underpins our New Zealand Vogue scene. Our Vogue scene is extremely young and sits in a precarious space that is still coming of age. The Vogue scene in Auckland is predominantly made up of Maori and Pacific people under the age of 30. This fact is so evident in the brown presence and visibility at the recent Vogue balls in Auckland. This is important to understand when thinking of the identity of our small scene and how it occupies cultural space as an event.

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The B O D Y Vogue Ball was about celebrating these brown bodies and creating a self determined space for free expression and unwrapping the social expectations placed on queer indigenous people in this country. Since transitioning into our new home on K-Road at Auckland’s most prolific gay bar – Family Bar, we’ve attempted to maintain this Pro Pacific, pro Polynesian and pro indigenous context to frame the Ball and ultimately the framing of the active vogue scene.

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AITU Vogue ball sought to continue this contextual framing by designing and delivering an event that spoke to our unique cultural expressions and aesthetics of our core Maori / Pacific / Indigenous  audience. In polynesian languages the word AITU refers to ghost or spirit, while Pulotu refers to the underworld. This Vogue Ball asked the community to embody their cultural connections to Pulotu and the world of AITU. The results saw the cultural activation of Family Bar through projections of authenticity and realness.

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Our resident FAFSWAG photography artist Jermaine Dean has been building an important portfolio of work that documents the scene and the cultural movement in real time. These images show the complex relationships social and cultural, spacial and emotional and at the same time reflect the unraveling of rigid gender and sexuality norms.

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While the images don’t capture in an obvious way the complex relationship of DJ to MC, MC to performer, performer to audience, the resulting energy of that relationship electrifies these images and reveals truth in our scenes performers that is beautifully empowered through their cultural context.

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The Ball scene is young, and as custodians of this space we’re working to grow in ways that are natural, authentic and that come from the space. We’re really keen to get input from those of you that grace our floors with your rich cultural context and powerful body ownership. We look forward to rolling out some ideas on how to have these conversations within our community. So be sure to stay subscribed to our facebook page for updates.

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To the team that continue to support this movement and culture, we want to thank you for the life you give and energy you bring to our scene. THANK YOU TO OUR JUDGES Rosanna Raymond, Jahra Rager, Alyssa, Sam Samau and Pati Solomona Tyrell. Thank you our chanting queen – Akashi. Thank you DJ Reina Sutton. Thank you to our sponsors Paper Bag Princess. Thank you to FAMILY BAR for opening up these mainstream space for us to occupy. Thank you to our team – you know who you are and lastly thank you to our community of voguers and walkers. This event wouldn’t be possible without you. 

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FAFSWAG’S SELECTS FOR TEMPO

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Tempo Dance Festival puts an annual spotlight on dance and movement in Aotearoa. With the ball scene situated quite nicely as an event that celebrates Vogue as a culture as well as an art form, we thought it would be great to list some of the upcoming shows that share the same vigor for culture and movement. These are the shows we’re excited to catch at this years Tempo Dance Festival.

Bare in mind that everyone has their own taste and these flavours are just a few spices that stimulate our own taste buds. This aint a TRUMP term in the White-House and you’re more than welcome to form your own opinions #GodBlessDemocracy #HappyTempo

Click the images for details.

#5 SRINGARAM – DANCE OF LOVE
SWAROOPA UNNI

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#4 SIVA NIU SILA
KATERINA FATUPAITO | JAHRA RAGER | TUPUA TIGAFUA | NIKKI UPOKO

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#3 TAUMATA – FOUR NEW WORKS
BIANCA HYSLOP (THE NEW ZEALAND DANCE COMPANY) | TAANE METE (OKAREKA DANCE COMPANY) | SARAH FOSTER-SPROULL (FOSTER GROUP) LOUGHLAN PRIOR (ROYAL NEW ZEALAND BALLET) |

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#2 VU
VOU DANCE FIJI

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#1 THE SCENIC VIEW
CAT RUKA | RALPH BROWN | MIT PERFORMING ARTS STUDENTS

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